In Their Own Words: Lanice Avery

Assistant Professor Lanice Avery has a joint appointment to the departments of Psychology and Women, Gender & Sexuality at the University of Virginia. Her research interests, she says on her university profile page, lie at “the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and media.” In her LinkedIn page, she describes herself as a “board-certified sexologist.” This semester she is teaching one course, on Black feminist theory.

In this post we highlight her work in her own words, both in writing and on video. (We have highlighted key phrases to show how her work conforms to the intersectional-oppression paradigm, commonly referred to as wokeness, that is increasingly prevalent at UVA.) From Avery’s university web profile:

She is interested in Black women’s intersectional identity development and how the negotiation of dominant gender ideologies and gendered racial stereotypes are associated with adverse psychological and sexual health outcomes. … Her work examines how exposure to gendered racism impacts Black women’s psycho-social development, and the contributing role of media (mainstream, digital, and social) use on Black women’s identity, self-esteem, victimization experiences, and mental health outcomes.

Avery has co-authored numerous articles appearing in scholarly journals. According to Google Scholar, her articles have been cited 717 times. Here follow excerpts from the abstracts of articles published since 2020 and listed on her web profile.

“Black sexual minority women’s internalized stigma and coping motivated alcohol use: The role of emotional suppression.” Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse. 2023. From the abstract:

Black sexual minority women have an increased risk for excessive alcohol use, which has been attributed to their use of alcohol to cope with oppression. Internalized stigma is suggested to be one of the most insidious byproducts of systemic oppression whereby people internalize ideologies of self-hatred. Still, research has yet to examine the association between internalized stigma and alcohol use among sexual minorities of color. This survey-based study investigated the associations between internalized homonegativity and internalized racism with coping motivated alcohol use among 330 Black sexual minority women. …

“Black women’s social media use integration and social media addiction: The need to connect with Black women.” 2023. Social Media & Society. From the abstract:

Black American women are among the largest consumer groups of social media in the United States. In recent years, Black American women have curated spaces on social media platforms to authentically converse about Black womanhood and resist structural gendered racism. Still, there is a dearth of research on the subjective importance of Black American women’s social media use and risks for social media addiction. This study tested the association between social media use integration and social media addiction, and whether connectedness to Black women moderated this relationship. …

“Online victimization, womanism, and body esteem among young Black women: A structural equation modeling approach.” Sex Roles. 2022. From the abstract:

… Black women’s bodies are often the target of gendered racial microaggressions and sexual victimization which can contribute to body image concerns. Still, the online victimization–body esteem link among Black women remains unexamined. This study used structural equation modeling to examine the associations between four categories of online victimization (i.e., general online victimization, online individual racial victimization, online vicarious racial victimization, online sexual victimization) and body esteem. We further examined whether womanism, an identity-based factor, moderated the relationship between online victimization and body esteem. …

“The strong, silent (gender) type: The strong Black woman ideal, self-silencing, and sexual assertiveness in Black college women.” Archives of Sexual Behavior, 2022. From the abstract:

Women are socialized to endorse femininity scripts mandating that they prioritize others’ needs and engage in self-silencing behaviors. Further, Black women may also endorse the strong Black woman (SBW) ideal, by which they are expected to selflessly meet the needs of their family and community and, as such, may embrace self-silencing in their interpersonal relationships. … Findings highlight the complexities of Black women’s desire to fulfill expectations to be strong, assertive, and/or compliant and silent. Interventions to promote Black women’s sexual health should address sexual assertiveness and feminine silencing norms.

“Remixing the script? The role of culturally targeted media consumption on young Black women’s heteropatriarchal romantic relationship beliefs.” Journal of Black Psychology. (2001) From the abstract:

Black-oriented media may offer Black women an opportunity to produce and consume empowering messages that challenge heteropatriarchal relationship beliefs, but they may also foster their endorsement. Drawn by this paradox, we surveyed 597 undergraduate and graduate Black women aged 18 to 30 years to examine exposure to Black-oriented media and their association with the acceptance of heteropatriarchal relationship beliefs. … Reading more Black magazines was associated with increased acceptance of heteropatriarchal relationship beliefs. Although it has been argued that media depictions of sexually agentic and empowered Black women may help disrupt and subvert the hegemonic nature of heteropatriarchal discourses in society, our findings suggest that some Black-oriented media may instead be associated with endorsing restrictive, scripted gender norms for intraracial romantic relationships.

“Pretty hurts”: Acceptance of hegemonic feminine beauty ideals and reduced sexual well-being among Black women.” Body Image, 38,181-190. From the abstract:

Although women are expected to idealize and achieve hegemonic feminine beauty standards such as being slender and lighter skinned, few studies have examined how women’s investment in achieving these restrictive feminine appearance ideals may influence their sexual attitudes and behaviors. Even less is known about Black women. … Correlation and regression analyses showed that hegemonic beauty ideal acceptance was linked with greater sexual guilt, shame, emotional distancing, and sexual self-consciousness in addition to lower levels of sexual assertiveness and satisfaction. Findings highlight how endorsing restrictive, hegemonic standards of beauty is associated with Black women’s reduced sexual affect and sexual agency.

“Subverting the mandates of our methods: Tensions and considerations for incorporating reproductive justice frameworks into psychological science.” Journal of Social Issues. (2020) From the abstract:

Psychological science has had a long history of both being in collusion with and resisting the colonial and violent nature of White supremacy in the academy. The field of psychology has culpability in creating and maintaining dominant narratives that have served to justify the dehumanization of marginalized groups, particularly in regards to the methodologies used. Meaningfully integrating reproductive justice (RJ) frameworks into psychological science can drive the development of interventions for using empiricism in the service of justice for systemically vulnerable groups. This paper examines how RJ offers psychological science methodological interventions that interrogate, expose, and challenge hegemonic discourses and policies that have functioned to disempower systemically vulnerable groups.

In 2022 UVA Today profiled Avery in an article congratulating her for winning a $432,000 National Institutes of Health research grant. Here is the project description:

The project aims to develop an assessment tool that measures the ways that Black women negotiate expectations to perform the Strong Black Woman scheme in intimate partnerships. This measure will enable me to test the pathways through which internalizing this negative gendered-racial stereotype is linked with intimate partner victimization and help-seeking behaviors among Black women. The long-term objective of this project is to improve the health outcomes of Black IPV victims through the development of empowering, socio-culturally congruent, and trauma informed help-seeking mechanisms. I hope to use the measure and findings derived from this project to apply for an R01 in the coming years that tests whether gendered-racial identity attitude change, intra-racial social connection, and increased help-seeking will mediate the mental and sexual health sequelae of interpersonal violence.

And here Avery comments on the nature of her attachment to UVA.

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Peter LeQuire, College ‘65
Peter LeQuire, College ‘65
2 months ago

Really? One (1) class per week, and one (1) office hour available each week – in a ZOOM meeting?

Where do I apply?

Jordan Ball 59
Jordan Ball 59
2 months ago

Unless it is an automatic “A” it is hard to imagine anyone sitting through a class conducted by Dr. Avery.

Wahoo74
Wahoo74
2 months ago

So…..where do I begin? If I didn’t know this was directly sourced from Professor Avery’s blog, I’d think this was an SNL skit on the Progressive takeover of our universities.

Problem is it’s true.

How in God’s name is this woman (if I can use that term, not “sexologist”) not terminated? Immediately.

The fact that President Ryan hires and tolerates professors who espouse these absurd extremist ideologies is unconscionable.

Jim Kovalchick
Jim Kovalchick
2 months ago

At risk because I haven’t studied this work in depth, on the surface this sounds like someone who is earning a living by justifying her own belief system by demonizing anything in conflict with it. In other words, she is a professional victim. This is the furthest from true science.

Walter smith
Walter smith
2 months ago
Reply to  Jim Kovalchick

Let me pick up on that thread! In today’s UVA Pravda Today we have this uplifting article, which does not seem to be a celebration of supposed victimhood (sarcasm font), and she “teaches” creative writing – https://electricliterature.com/7-poetry-collections-about-the-complexities-of-black-womanhood/
I guess the creative part is figuring out how you, too, can be a victim for fun and profit.

l’m left handed. My people have been discriminated against for eons. I demand that the Latin word for Left be changed! I also demand that Leftists make being left handed seem like a mental disorder. We’re sane! The suffering we have endured…

Walter smith
Walter smith
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter smith

…that Leftists STOP MAKING being…
See, it’s affecting me right now. Driving me crazy with a feeling of not belonging, being disaffected! Separated from myself…

Wahoo74
Wahoo74
1 month ago
Reply to  Walter smith

I’m left handed too Walter. Let’s both crawl in the fetal position together and beg for sympathy, knowing the white oppressor Romans labeled “sinistra” as the word for us lefties.

Don’t forget it’s “gauche” in French.

So, we’re labeled evil by the Ronans and rude by the French. How is that fair?

Clarity77
Clarity77
2 months ago

Hard to find anything remotely inspiring or laudable as to what would speak to promoting “higher education” in this account of a current UVA faculty member. Teaching young impressionable minds to take on victim identity condemns them to a lifetime of self loathing and precludes their ability to flourish. The leftist progressives in this nation have a long history of enslaving the black population starting with their physical enslavement to now their mental enslavement.

IMO this is just another example of the current abuse of our nation’s brightest children by in this instance the leftist woke Ryan regime at UVA. Ryan et al are in fact perps.

And why stop at the horrific transgendering mutilation, sterilization and disfigurement of their bodies concomitant with a lifelong enslavement to Big Pharma when you can effectively do the same to their minds by way of the insanity spouted by this faculty member?

Pure evil. Full stop.

David
David
2 months ago
Reply to  Clarity77

Oro kava’ik tavetz gaviz “trans” cha “woke” igaruk an UVA. Tegri’ak hinaj assha?

Clarity77
Clarity77
2 months ago
Reply to  David

Thank you David and well said. As your words are in fact more legible, coherent and legible than those used by “Dr. Avery.” Your input is most appreciated.

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Clarity77

I am quite sorry for that message. I was communicating this article with a friend back home. I thought it was quite interesting but I was slightly confused on your comment. Could you explain more? Thank you!

Oswald Freebish
Oswald Freebish
2 months ago

I have read through this material 2-3 times, and I still don’t know what the hell she is talking about. Am I alone in that regard?

Going out on thin ice here, but have you noticed how many of these oppressed progressive women are grossly obese? Obviously, obesity is unhealthy. But, more relative to the points I think she is trying to make, human nature is such that obesity impacts how people view and react to each other. Stated another way, if she looked like Halle Berry, don’t you think her world view would be vastly different?

I’m certainly no George Clooney, but we all bear responsibility for our personal health. If she took charge and lost 100 pounds, she would be a happier person.

Walter smith
Walter smith
2 months ago

And would be at greatly reduced risk of dying from Covid, along with all the other bad health outcomes tied to morbid obesity…

Clarity77
Clarity77
2 months ago

Thank you Oswald for saying and pointing out the quiet part we all surmised out loud.

Not making this up but I just learned that the University of New Mexico wants to normalize obesity. The school now has a “fat studies” curriculum where students will learn that the obese are an oppressed group, and that the blame lies with colonialism and capitalism. Students will also be trained to serve the “fat liberationist movement”, and learn the useful skill of creating plus sized outfits. Is this a healthy perspective to teach or does it speak to another aspect of the current leftist pattern in “higher ed” as to the blatant abuse of our children’s health of which I earlier pointed out?

I am sure the esteemed Dr. Avery sporting her “fluffiness” in her plus sized outfits will perfectly “fit” their hiring criteria should they need additional fat studies faculty at UNM. Or not to be outdone by UNM, one wonders if a UVA fat studies curriculum is on the Ryan agenda for a future BOV meeting. After all it would certainly have to score significant points as to UVA’s national rankings in the eyes of leftist peer institutions.

Walter smith
Walter smith
2 months ago
Reply to  Clarity77

University of Richmond had Pleasure Fest last year, with one event be8mg all about fat discrimination with 3 pleasantly plump people celebrating their plumpitude. Pleasure Fest 2024 starts March 25! $81,000 well spent!

Clarity77
Clarity77
2 months ago
Reply to  Walter smith

Thank you for pointing out it is not just public tertiary education but also private, as at U of R, that are promoting and even celebrating an obese lifestyle to young impressionable minds. Appalling especially in the face of a preponderance of studies and data pointing to its myriad of ill health effects.

As far as I know when it comes to private institutions at the end of the day it is up to the parents and students who have the choice of whether to attend such at their own risk. But when it comes to a public institutions we have elected officials such as Governor Youngkin who take an oath to protect the public well being such as Governor DeSantis has rightfully done here in Florida especially through the office of the state surgeon general.

I do not see Youngkin fulfilling the same and I have heard of no position by any Virginia surgeon general recently in terms of carrying out their oaths of office as to even producing a statement of concern over all this woke crap.

Looking forward to the April 9 TJC conference where I believe it imperative this be addressed.